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Mandating physical education

"State policies mandating physical education and recess associated with increase in overall in-school physical activity among children." Science Daily. These findings could help schools make policies that promote ...Most grade school students are likely to claim recess as their favorite period of the day; however, in many cases recess still can be sedentary with students not engaging in enough physical activity. Despite widespread cuts to physical education classes and recess, an Indiana University study has shown that schools can play an important role in helping their students live healthier lives.

E.) policies and practices and nutrition at their schools. Those states and school districts that followed the guidelines were categorized as “strong”; those that recommended but didn’t enforce the suggestions were classified as “weak.” Most schools fell into neither category because they have no regulations whatsoever, according the research, which was published Monday in the MORE: The Older Kids Get, The Less They Move In the proof-of-human-nature department — unless you’re required to do something, you probably won’t — researchers found that the 4% of schools in the six strong states or districts were nearly three times more likely to meet the 150-minute recommendation.Regular physical activity can help prevent serious medical issues like cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity.Requiring PE classes exposes students to a variety of activities that can help them lead healthy lifestyles as adults and combat serious medical problems.Sports and games in the context of physical education classes can offer character building opportunities for students.Teamwork, cooperation and sportsmanship are just a few of the life lessons that can be learned in a PE class.“Increasing the amount of physical activity that kids have during the day is not necessarily going to hurt overall academic achievement,” says Slater. Team Sports Don’t Offer Nearly Enough Exercise In an accompanying editorial, Dr. classes, Madsen proposes levying a tax on sugary beverages and junk food, many of which are available in school vending machines.

Kristine Madsen of the University of California, San Francisco, provocatively suggests that “lack of physical activity may be a far greater public health problem than obesity.” It’s hard to argue that the two aren’t intertwined. “The solution is not limited to the local, state or national level, but rather, the solution rests with decision makers at each level,” she writes.

Madsen notes that one of the barriers to the adoption of laws and policies to increase school-day physical activity is funding.

However, she also notes that, "there is an underused funding solution that would promote children's nutrition and at the same time provide needed resources to support adoption of exemplary nutrition and physical activity standards and programs: the taxation of highly sweetened beverages and nutrient-poor junk food." "One concerning finding from the Slater et al study is that recess and PE can compete with each other for time in the school day; schools that offered more time in recess offered less time in PE, and vice versa," writes Dr. "While schools appear to use PE and recess somewhat interchangeably, PE and recess make unique and separate contributions." "The solution is not limited to the local, state or national level, but rather, the solution rests with decision makers at each level," Dr. "We must work together to advocate for our nation's greatest resource -- our youth." JAMA and Archives Journals. "State policies mandating physical education and recess associated with increase in overall in-school physical activity among children." Science Daily. Researchers find that the duration and timing of lunch and recess is related to food choices and the physical activity of school children.

The authors found that approximately 70 percent of schools included in the analysis offered at least 20 minutes of daily recess, and 17.9 percent offered 150 minutes/week of physical education.

The majority of states (83 percent) offered no daily recess law and less than half offered some kind of law addressing the recommended 150 minutes/week of physical education.

"Our results show that mandating only increased physical education or recess time does not result in more overall physical activity as schools and/or districts appear to compensate for any increased physical activity in one area by decreasing other physical activity opportunities," the authors conclude. H., of the University of California, San Francisco writes, "as a result of the current focus on reversing the obesity epidemic, the benefits of increased physical activity are becoming more widely discussed.